When You Go Buy Oranges by Maya Sistruck

When you go to buy oranges on Martha’s Vineyard, don’t take the 10am ferry. The boattraffic at that time will be terrible—crowds of burly fishermen, sticky children, and wivesin feathery hats will swarm the port of Oak Bluffs, desperate to start their day. Thecarousel will have just opened for the summer, off-tuned music and candy-colored … Read moreWhen You Go Buy Oranges by Maya Sistruck

O Evangelho do Diabo (Pt 3) by Fran Attié

Chico Rex A bird falls from the sky right outside the house of a boy who will become a preacher to tame his fellow-man. He rushes to the bird, who dies in his hand, so green, he’s never seen such colors. He wants to care for it, but his mother shows him the bird’s heart … Read moreO Evangelho do Diabo (Pt 3) by Fran Attié

An Intro to Shadow Work by Nancy Azcona

I. A few months ago I wrote the first article of a series I wanted to continue for the rest of the year called Reclaimed. The first one was about my body then shortly after, I relapsed on all of my EDs, felt like a fraud, and abandoned the series. And that is the reason … Read moreAn Intro to Shadow Work by Nancy Azcona

Let’s Compare by Megan Elevado

I use the eye roll and pink beating heart emoji most, followed by the two laughing-so-hard-I’m-crying faces. The yellow thumbs up is now my alternative to typing “ok.” I’ve recently settled on using the default yellow for all those hand signals and other body parts emoji. My skin color falls between the available skin tone … Read moreLet’s Compare by Megan Elevado

The Dualities of Visiting Your Motherland by Amanda Etemad

The first time I went to Iran I was only sixteen, still in high school, traveling with a parent, and naive to so much of the world, but eager to learn more about my roots. Growing up as one of the only Iranian-Americans in my tiny, majority white suburb left me with many questions about … Read moreThe Dualities of Visiting Your Motherland by Amanda Etemad

Paris, Je t’aime by Kelli Josette

Growing up, I considered being French the closest thing I had to a cultural heritage. My maternal grandmother, with whom I spent a good deal of time with, was a first-generation French immigrant. She moved to America in 1955, she was 25, a widow with a baby. She did not know any English and did … Read moreParis, Je t’aime by Kelli Josette

Heaven On Earth by Z.N. Han

Artwork by @Rachcreates_ Time moves like molasses sliding down the side of a jar – in a good way.  She sure as hell had known her fair share of molasses moments that were not of the positive variety. But as time once again slows down in that inexplicable way, the former assassin feels a peace … Read moreHeaven On Earth by Z.N. Han

The White Boyfriend by Roxanne Nagarwalla

Artwork by Francois-Henri Galland Your white boyfriend likes to eat, and he eats a lot.  Your white boyfriend says he wants to go to your ‘father’s restaurant’, meaning he is craving Indian food. He chuckles at his own joke. Your father is in New York and works in finance.  Your white boyfriend and you eat … Read moreThe White Boyfriend by Roxanne Nagarwalla

THE NIKE RUN CLUB or How to Have a Quarter-Life Crisis Without Even Realizing It by Cheech Manohar

The first man I dated when I moved to New York City was eight years older than me. I was 21 and he was 29, and for our first date, we went to see the Broadway play Significant Other. In case you’re unfamiliar, Sig O is a play about a gay man in his late … Read moreTHE NIKE RUN CLUB or How to Have a Quarter-Life Crisis Without Even Realizing It by Cheech Manohar

The Meaning of Mine by Arsha Adarsh

The day before my flight home, my Tarot deck arrives. It’s a surprise; I forgot I’d ordered it. If I hadn’t delayed leaving, I’d have missed it. The box is turquoise with finely curled white writing above the upper half of a woman’s face. Her hair is curled into two loose buns, with a crescent … Read moreThe Meaning of Mine by Arsha Adarsh

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